Gettin' fresh … in Northern Nevada

The Practice of Producing Pepper Plants

Last year, I took up an offer for some free pepper seeds.   Not just ordinary old seeds from any store or even specialty seeds from the overpriced home garden shop, I got seeds from a fellow blogger.   Blogmeister, if you will:   The Peppermeister.    Sir Pep happily shared a nice bounty of pepper seeds and I have attempted to make them grow.

Attempt is the key word here, people.   Attempt.

Here are my lovelies in late March, all full of hope and dreams:

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I was particularly proud of my nice little labels for all of the varieties that I was going to soon harvest.   Please comment on how nice the labels are, it will make me feel better.

Take a look at my first born sprout.   This is a magic moment in Pepperkind.

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Progress is happening … aren’t they pretty?

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Here, my lovelies were growing nicely and the weather was getting warm so I decided it was time to migrate my seedlings to a protected area out in the yard.

HONESTLY, I attempted to protect them.   Attempt is the key word again.   Ugh.

Devastation.    It was colder that day than expected and the direct sunlight was not kind.   Dammit.

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Well, a few survived and I’m still attempting to produce a few pepper plants.   Wish me luck.  I’ll keep you posted.

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8 responses

  1. Oh no! I’m so sorry your pepper plants are not as happy as they once were. I very often suck at sticking a seed in a pot and ending up with a productive plant, so I skipped a few steps and ordered some banana pepper plants (since I never seem to find them around here, only bell and jalapeños). 3 lovely plants went into the ground. Some (*&^%$’in critter dug one of them up, and I didn’t notice for a day or so. I stuck the traumatized plant back in the ground, just in case, and I think there’s a teensy bit of growth amidst the rubble of the dead leaves. We’ll see. Other two growing strong.

    What vegetable is doing best in my garden? The celery I re-grew from the bottoms of the last of the fall CSA boxes. What vegetable do we not love the most? Celery. And yet it thrives. Good thing the pigs will eat the excess.

    June 8, 2013 at 6:41 am

    • That’s funny. I didn’t realize that celery would regrow like that until last year when I saw someone posting their son’s science project photos on Facebook. And, I’ll be darned. That celery just grew and grew … go figure.

      June 8, 2013 at 10:08 am

  2. Good luck to you! I was lucky enough to receive some seedlings from the venerable Peppermeister recently. So far, so good, but I am really scared to transplant them for fear of pepper failure! Tomorrow is D-day.

    June 8, 2013 at 2:42 pm

    • May the force be with you. I’m clinging dearly to my survivors. 🙂

      June 9, 2013 at 5:08 pm

  3. Whoa, those might be the best looking plant labels I have ever laid eyes upon! The first year growing peppers is always the toughest, you’ll learn a lot though. I really like that tub, cool idea!

    June 9, 2013 at 2:13 pm

    • Thanks. I take great pride in my label skills. Maybe, I should buy pepper plants and just label them. I’m sure that wouldn’t be as much fun, though, RIGHT?

      June 9, 2013 at 5:10 pm

  4. I didn’t know that about celery either and I’m excited to try that!

    June 13, 2013 at 8:33 pm

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